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chintoo
04-06-2011, 03:05 PM
Hello everyone!
i know i my sound stupid, but what all do i need to program my 16f877As with a PICkit 2?? Should i just insert in the 6pin header and wire it to the relevant pins (read from datasheet) of 877A or do i also need additional circuitry for it?
Also, where can i get PICkit 2 in out country? everyone selling here is charging a lot more than just $50!

vikas
04-06-2011, 04:31 PM
No you need a basic power up circuit.

http://www.nex-robotics.com/products/microcontroller-programmer.html

There is a lot to selling stuff in india , vendors like above usually pay import duty , VAT and other taxes . And then they have to keep a margin to cover costs and make a profit.And hence you see the costs.

If you want it for cheap , get it from microchip ... ill recommend this method.

chintoo
04-06-2011, 05:56 PM
Thanks Vikas!
And what would that basic power up circuit comprise of? Won't the Vpp, Vdd and ground come directly from the PICkit? Do i need to add some caps and resistors? The ICSP adapters at http://www.j1sys.com/icsp-adapters/ don't use any extra components. (i dont see any!)


Also, how's PICkit 3 doing these days? i haven't come across any praise for it on web...

chintoo :)

vikas
04-06-2011, 07:39 PM
Basically meaning you power up the uC properly :) , thats all.

pickit 2 / 3 are both fine , but if you are seriously looking at dev look into ICD 3.

Pickit are Full Speed USB and ICD is High Speed ( Very fast debugging / programming ) .

I have Both and ICD 3 kicks ass :) .

shobhitkukreti
04-06-2011, 08:31 PM
I have a pickit3 and ICD2, both work fine. I am probably going to sell one of them. if you are interested, let me know

chintoo
04-06-2011, 10:21 PM
@vikas dhanyawaad! Okay. i'm coming out of the confusions now. So basically what i do is

'connect the PICkit (or any programmer for that matter) to the PIC (to be programmed) on breadboard and add additional circuitry to make sure PIC gets powered up properly (13V at Vpp, 5V @ Vdd, Vss grounded). I dont need to play around with the PGD and PGC...'

right??

And thanks shobhit. i'll keep it in mind. I'm still not sure what to go for; PICkit or ICD...

chintoo :)

allbits
04-07-2011, 08:30 AM
Its not necessary to power up the target board.

After you connect PicKit through MPLAB, go to programmer>Settings>power and check the relevant box which says power up target from pickit.

Anyways, its always recommended to power up the target board.

chintoo
04-07-2011, 10:18 AM
@allbits
hmm...
But for me, there's no target board, just loose MCU. That's why i talked of breadboard in my last post. Will checking the 'power up target from PICkit' option in MPLAB send out appropriate voltages (13V Vpp, 5V Vdd, 0 at Vss) through the PICkit pinouts (so that i dont have to power up the controller separately)?? If it is so, i'll just connect the wires from PICkit to PIC and get it programmed...

allbits
04-07-2011, 03:36 PM
Thats right.
Connect the pins directly to the chip and that will do the trick. Dont forget to check out the configuration bits, if not set in code. Thats one common mistake done by many.

shobhitkukreti
04-07-2011, 08:32 PM
Chintoo, you should refer to the user guide of pickit3 or icd3. It shows how to connect a MCU and the programmer. The programmer can provide the voltage to your test circuit, but it is better to provide power to your mcu from your separate power supply. If you make a circuit, then make sure your PGD and PGC pins are free while your mcu is in the circuit.

chintoo
04-07-2011, 10:12 PM
Thanks a lot everyone! I think i've figured it out after all (with you guys' help ofcourse).
I've ordered a PICkit2 with zif socket ICSP adapters from ebay. (@shobhit thanks for your offer but i thought getting a new one with the adapters to program loose chips is a good deal)
The delivery will reach me by next weekend hopefully. I'll get back to you guys if i need any further help. Thanks a lot once again...

-chintoo :)